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Kidsworld Club

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Lord Ganesh - Milk Miracle

The ‘milk miracle’ of Lord Ganesh

 

Dear Children

You might have read about Lord Ganesh under 'Hindu Gods and Godesess'. We will now go on to see of a very recent miracle that occurred as recently as on September 21st 1995.

Lord Ganesh became globally popular with this miracle which is popularly known as ‘milk miracle’. It all began on 21st September 1995 that an ordinary man in a sub urban of Delhi, Capital city of India, dreamt that Lord Ganesh craved for milk.

Upon awakening, just after dawn, he rushed to the local temple. He explained about his dream to the priest who did not took him serious. Nonetheless he allowed the man to offer a spoonful of milk to the small stone idol of Lord Ganesh.

Both watched in astonishment as the liquid was seen to disappear, apparently taken in by the idol.

What followed is unprecedented in modern Hindu history. Within hours news had spread like a bush fire across India that Ganesha was accepting milk offerings. Tens of millions of people of all ages flocked to the nation's temples.

The unworldly happening brought worldly New Delhi to a standstill, and its vast stocks of milk - more than a million liters - sold out within hours.

By noon the news had spread beyond India, and Hindu temples in Britain, Canada, Dubai, Hong Kong, and Nepal among other countries had successfully replicated the phenomenon, and the Vishva Hindu Parishad (an Indian Hindu organisation) had announced that a miracle was occurring. 

The apparent miracle had a significant effect on the areas around major temples; vehicle and pedestrian traffic in New Delhi was dense enough to create a gridlock lasting until late in the evening.

Many stores in areas with significant Hindu communities saw a massive jump in sales of milk, with one Gateway store in England selling over 25,000 pints of milk, and overall milk sales in New Delhi jumped over 30%.

Many minor temples struggled to deal with the vast increase in numbers, and queues spilled out into the streets, reaching distances of over a mile.

This unique phenomenon was picked up by news services around the world, including CNN, the BBC, the New York Times, Daily Express and the Guardian. Even the skeptical journalists held their milk-filled spoons to the statues of gods - and watched as the milk disappeared.

Many scientist and professors from leading universities and institutions had offered capillary action as an explanation; the surface tension of the milk was pulling the liquid up and out of the spoon, before gravity caused it to run down the front of the statue etc.

However when questioned by the journalists, they could not offer any explanation as to how it occurred almost simultaneously worldwide and only to the Lord Ganesh idols.

Just as suddenly as it started in India, it stopped in just 24 hours and that was seen as a further proof offered that what had happened was indeed a miracle.

Writing in The Guardian on 22 September 1995, Suzanne Goldenberg said "India's gods milk their faithful in a brief 'miracle' while Tim McGirk of The Independent on the same day had this to say "India's thirsty statues drink the nation dry".

The UK Sun’s David Wooding put his astonishment this way: "Cow do they do that"?(sic)

As a result Lord Ganesh became very popular globally and the Lord’s idols can now be seen in many non hindu celebrities’ home and gardens.

Since it was a very recent event, ask your parents about it and they may share with you of their expericences on this.

We shall read later a beautiful story of a Little boy Nambi (Nambi-yandar Nambi) who fed Lord Ganesh. This story happened in South India in the 10th century.